Thursday, April 29, 2010

 

Portable Computing Installment: Palm Pilot

Today's announcement that Palm has agreed to be acquired by HP reminds me that it's been a while since I've done an installment of my history with portable computing. On the subject of being acquired, it's probably worth remembering that Palm has had a few owners over time, including U.S. Robotics and 3COM. Of course, HP had recently acquired 3COM, providing another one of those Silicon Valley paths crossing things. Also need to stop a moment and reminisce about U.S. Robotics, who was possibly best known at the the time for its modems. With high-speed internet access past 50% for U.S. households, there are generations of children who will not have experienced the hiss and boing-boing of dial ups. I remember the thrill of making my first modem connection. I need a moment.

I decided to join the Palm Pilot cult, and it was kind of like that, in 1997. I'd asked a co-worker at the time about his. I think I asked about how rugged it was. With the tech religious fervor that we've all come to expect, he threw his across the floor, with the battery case cover popping off and batteries flying out and landing under a desk. He put the batteries back in and it started right up.

The demo was good enough for me. There was so much to like, but the desktop synchronization was an example of how things should be designed. Dock it in its cradle, press one button, done.

I held on to that Palm for so long that I'd sometimes pull it out and have people variously wonder what it was or laugh at me for being so retro. Let's see. It provided me with a calendar, contacts, and notes. Anything else I need? Nope.

Later on, I replaced the Pilot with a Tungsten E2, but that was mainly for the nicer display. I still use it today along with a Blackberry. It does what I need.

I've written here about my first smartphone purchase. I really liked the Treo, and it made the most sense given that I already was a Palm person. But I finally went Blackberry to connect to Exchange at work. There were ways to connect the Treo, but the IT policy was Blackberry and it looked like they took measures to prevent non-Blackberry connections. You have to wonder how much that Blackberry lock in to Exchange hurt Palm.

Labels: ,


Comments:
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
 
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
 
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
 
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
 
It is hard to believe that anything [B][URL=http://www.mbtplus.com/]mbt shoes best prices[/URL][/B] so inherently ugly as the MBT shoe could ever catch on [U]mbt sandals[/U] with either the younger generation or the fitness fanatics but it has. [B]MBT shoes[/B] The shoes or I suppose they should be called trainers have thick curved soles and wide straps across the front. Currently [U][B]MBT shoes[/U][/B] the are available in over 20 countries and have sold more than a million pairs a year. Considering that they have a price tag of around $200 it is even [B]mbt walking shoes[/B] more remarkable.

MBT shoes, which stand for Masai [B]mbt shoes cheap[/B] Barefoot Technology were invented by Karl Muller a Swiss engineer. He [B]shoe for worked[/B] suffered back and knee problems but on a trip to Korea he noticed [U][B]mbt discount shoes[/U][/B] that after walking barefoot through paddy fields the symptoms were relieved. With further [U]MBT[/U] research he discovered that the Masai tribesmen from Kenya did not suffer back problems [B]shoe for worked[/B] and had perfect posture. Putting these two facts together he decided that [U]mbt sneakers[/U] the answer was because they were walking on soft surfaces [U]mbt sneakers[/U] which yielded as they trod on them. This [U]mbt shoes sale[/U] was unlike in Europe and America where we tend to walk on firm surfaces such as sidewalks.

The first MBT was manufactured in 1996 and soon [U][B]mbt sandals[/U][/B] became popular on continental Europe. Since then many celebrities have [B]mbt sneakers[/B] been seen sporting MBTs. The concept basically is that the [U][B]mbt walking shoes[/U][/B] curved sole creates instability as you walk, which [U][B]mbt shoes sale[/U][/B] mimics the effect of walking barefoot. To counteract this the foot uses muscle to counter this [B][URL=http://www.mbtplus.com/]buy mbt shoes[/URL][/B] and creates a natural body training effect.


These are pretty bold claims but there is no doubt that MBT shoes are [U]MBT shoes[/U] popular both as recreation and sportswear. A study [U]footwear etc[/U] by Sheffield Hallam University recently concluded that MBT shoes were better for the knees ankles [U]mbt shoes sale[/U] than normal shoes. The study also concluded that if [U][B]mbt sandals[/U][/B] you walk correctly you would take shorter strides while walking in MBTs. Shorter [B]mbt sandals[/B] strides would mean more steps and more expending of energy and this [U][B]MBT[/U][/B] would increase your calorie burn.
 
Post a Comment

<< Home

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?